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Research BEAVERS

1. Beavers: Wetlands & Wildlife (B:W&W) -  Dolgeville, NY, USA
2. Avian use of different successional stage beaver ponds in Pennsylvania
3. The other materials are available now only in Russian... Translation coming soon...


1. Beavers: Wetlands & Wildlife (B:W&W) -

One of the best sites via the Internet today, devoted to the BEAVERS  Beavers: Wetlands & Wildlife (B:W&W)

Beavers: Wetlands&Wildlife, 146 Van Dyke Rd., Dolgeville, NY 13329

Fax: 518.568.6046, Email: beavers@telenet.net


Avian use of different successional stage beaver ponds in Pennsylvania

DIANN J. PROSSER
INTERCOLLEGE GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN ECOLOGY
SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES, PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY
MASTERS THESIS RESEARCH PROJECT
FUNDING PROVIDED BY THE PENNSYLVANIA GAME COMMISSION

Pennsylvania has a flourishing beaver (Castor canadensis) population. In 1994 there were estimated to be 26,000 beavers in the state, with an average 10% annual increase (Noonan 1994). Management of beaver in the future is not clear, due to the uncertainty of the European fur trade (concern with trapping methods, Kosack 1994) and the occurrence of nuisance complaints.
Beaver ponds provide valuable habitat for waterfowl and other avian species (Reese and Hair 1976, Grover and Baldasarre 1995). The life history of the beaver creates the development of a shifting mosaic of habitat structure from forested headwater streams to open water ponds, and eventually emergent wetlands. It is expected that many groups of avifauna benefit from some stage of beaver activity. For example, studies have shown that waterfowl readily use active beaver flowages (Beard 1953, Stanton 1965, Renouf 1972, Brown and Parsons 1979). Reclusive herons and rails, on the other hand, may use dense stands of emergent vegetation characteristic of older or abandoned beaver ponds (Gibbs et al. 1991). Wetland dependent songbirds may be found using various stages of beaver ponds depending on foraging and nesting requirements. Thus, any management of beaver ponds should be cognizant of effects on avian use of beaver ponds.

The objectives of this study were to:
1) Assess the differences in breeding bird communities along the gradient of beaver pond succession, and determine how these stages differ with respect to: (1) vegetative composition (species level), (2) habitat patch types and interspersion, and(3) basic water quality and water level fluctuation.
2) Determine differential waterfowl brood use in relation to beaver pond succession.
3) Assess available food resources (invertebrate and plant) for waterfowl.
4) Offer recommendations concerning beaver management in relation to beaver pond succession.

For more information about the project, contact: Diann J. Prosser djp137@psu.edu


Much more  materials (>95%) available now only in Russian
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